Allen - Unger Database European Commodity Prices 1260-1914

This website is dynamically created. The XML, CSV and results are created directly from the database.
All tables displayed are pulled directly from the master database to ensure the accuracy and currency of the data.
The data is present in two forms, one is a html table that can be ‘copy-pasted’ into a application of your choice. There is also located in the top corner of the ‘show data page’ a link to a Excel CSV spreadsheet file; right clicking on this and select ‘Save File As’ to download to your PC.
(note: If you left-click, the file will open in the browser. One will see the data separated by comma’s which can also be saved from the browser ‘File’ menu.)
The data found here can be accessed in three main ways.

  1. The Map interface presents the data graphically distributed across the globe.
    1. Clicking on a ‘pin’ pops up a menu that displays the name of the ‘market’ as well as a drop-list of the various commodity data available at this location. Having selected the commodity of interest, one then can click on “Download data file”. One can also select “download all” to get an aggregate data for this location containing all the commodity data for this market. This will request the data from the database and create a ‘Show Data’ page.
    2. The Map interface also has a ‘side-bar’ listing all the markets in the database. Clicking on the market title will cause the map to ‘focus’ and ‘open’ the pop-up from that market.
  2. The List interface presents the data by category.
    1. Clicking on each category will present a list of data, some meta data as well as a link to show the data. The List interface is divided into Market list, Commodity list, Currency list, Measures list and Sources list.
    2. The Market list displays the Market name, the date of the first data item in the database (db), the date of the last data item in the db, the total number of data items available and a list of commodity data available for this market.
      1. The Commodity title may, if present, a ‘variety’ subtype. Also, if there are more than two commodities for a market, an “All” item will be listed which is an aggregate of all the commodity data for this market. Clicking on a Commodity (or “ALL”) will send a request to the database for the information. This data will be presented in an HTML table which can be ‘copy-pasted’ into an application of your choice. Also present in the top-right corner a link. If you right click on this link and select “Save File As” you can download the Excel CSV Spreadsheet file to your PC. If you left-click, the file will be displayed in your browser as a set of comma separated values; selecting from your browsers ‘File’ menu “Save file as” will save the data as Excel CSV Spreadsheet.
    3. Commodity list view shows the commodity name, if present, a variety subtype will be displayed as well For example – Apple is one commodity as well as Apple, Dried. Also, the date of the first data item in the database (db), the date of the last data item in the db, the total number of data items available and a list of market data available for this commodity.
      1. The Market title is listed also, if there are more than two commodities for a market, an “All” item will be listed which is an aggregate of all the commodity data for this market. Clicking on a Market (or “ALL”) will send a request to the database for the information. This data will be presented in an HTML table which can be ‘copy-pasted’ into an application of your choice. Also present in the top-right corner a link. If you right click on this link and select “Save File As” you can download the Excel CSV Spreadsheet file to your PC. If you left-click, the file will be displayed in your browser as a set of comma separated values; selecting from your browsers ‘File’ menu “Save file as” will save the data as Excel CSV Spreadsheet.
    4. Currency list displays a list of all currencies used in the data base. The Currency name is listed as well as the ‘currency family name’ (Ie the ‘pound’ in British Pound), the date of the first data item in the database (db), the date of the last data item in the db, the total number of data items available, the standardized unit conversion data is for (ie gm Silver) and the ‘source’ market of the data.
      1. Clicking on the Currency name, a request to the database for the information is sent. This data will be presented in an HTML table which can be ‘copy-pasted’ into an application of your choice. Also present in the top-right corner a link. If you right click on this link and select “Save File As” you can download the Excel CSV Spreadsheet file to your PC. If you left-click, the file will be displayed in your browser as a set of comma separated values; selecting from your browsers ‘File’ menu “Save file as” will save the data as Excel CSV Spreadsheet.
    5. Measures List view shows all the measurement units present in the data base. This list can be downloaded by ‘right clicking’ on the link located in the top-right of the measure list. The common name is the name of the unit of measure, the Type is the ‘family of measure (ie. the ‘ounce’ of ‘British ounce’), the conversion factor used to standardized the measure, the standardized unit of measure, the ‘source’ market of the measure and the ‘alternative names’ for the unit of measure.
    6. Lastly, Source List presents a simple list of all sources/references found in the database.
  3. The Query interface allows one to create a custom data set.
    1. The main wizard allows one to select one, many or all markets and/or commodities; it also allows to define a particular period for requested data. Once selecting market(s), Commdity(s) and period, click on “Get Custom Data Set!” will send a request to the database for the information is sent. This data will be presented in an HTML table which can be ‘copy-pasted’ into an application of your choice. Also present in the top-right corner a link. If you right click on this link and select “Save File As” you can download the Excel CSV Spreadsheet file to your PC. If you left-click, the file will be displayed in your browser as a set of comma separated values; selecting from your browsers ‘File’ menu “Save file as” will save the data as Excel CSV Spreadsheet.
    2. Note: If no data marches your request, the ‘Show Data’ page may display an error.
    3. One can (although this is still experimental) create a custom ‘SQL’ script. Clicking on “Manually enter SQL!” will cause two pop-up requests. The first request is the ‘where’ part of the SQL command (Note: “Where” must be the first element in the string). A second request is the ‘order’ part of the SQL command (Note: “Order By” must be the first element in this string). Once the Second request is completed, a request to the database for the information is sent. This data will be presented in an HTML table which can be ‘copy-pasted’ into an application of your choice. Also present in the top-right corner a link. If you right click on this link and select “Save File As” you can download the Excel CSV Spreadsheet file to your PC. If you left-click, the file will be displayed in your browser as a set of comma separated values; selecting from your browsers ‘File’ menu “Save file as” will save the data as Excel CSV Spreadsheet.
    4. Note: If no data marches your request, the ‘Show Data’ page may display an error.
  4. Located in the “About and Notes” section one can find ‘Beer Excise Data’ collected by Dr. Unger for the low countries.
    1. Also located in in the “About and Notes” section is a list of web resources. Future development includes the creation of a Wiki. This Wiki will include definitions of terms, relevant histories of markets and other related information. The wiki will also provide a place where the ‘grey’ of standardization can be discussed. The wiki will also provide a discussion are about issues revolving around the conversion of weights/volumes to metric, the reliability of sources, the vagaries of silver content of currency, etc.
  5. Besides the ability to retrieve, the GCPdb is a living database; as such researchers, academics and enthusiasts are encouraged to submit data. Instructions on how to submit this data located on the “Submit Market Data Sets” page.

Any comments on both the site or its contents if greatly welcome. This is intended to be a global resourse for all - working together we can make this the best single research reference on the net. Perhaps working together we will be able to help clarify standards of reference (inpartuculate units of measure or currency conversion) that will help all researched.

Contact: Dr. Unger( richard.unger@ubc.ca)    or Dr. Allen ( bob.allen@nuffield.ox.ac.uk)

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